Internet Privacy For Newbie, Briefly


This is a short summary in protecting internet privacy that is easy to practice for any computer user.


Don’t use Google Search. Change your search engine to


Don’t use Google Chrome. Change your web browser to Mozilla Firefox, use privacy addons:

  • uBlock Origin: the best advertisement blocker.
  • HTTPS Everywhere: the encryptor of whole connections of each webpage you visit. With this, all connections are secure.
  • Privacy Badger: the antitracker, the purger of all online trackers, it secures your privacy by removing each website’s personal-info-collectors that do not respect your privacy.


Remember one thing: anything sent to the internet cannot be erased, forever. Best practice: don’t post your complete address on the internet, the same goes for everything else, so:

  • don’t send your phone number to facebook or others
  • don’t send copy of your photos, National ID Card, Driving License, or Family Registry, to facebook or others

This article is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.


Using Trisquel Everyday – Day 2


26 December 2017: the new ISO image of Trisquel 8 is out! It’s a long way for me because Trisquel 8 has no new ISO since June 2017.  The new ISO released at 24 December 2017 (two days ago) at jenkins subdomain of Trisquel website. Download it from Happy testing!

This article is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Using Trisquel Everyday – Day 1


I’m using Trisquel GNU/Linux version 8 codenamed Flidas since March 2017. I decided to write my daily experiences with Trisquel in a series, particularly at the most technically usable things. This ‘Day 1’ at the title doesn’t represent my first day, but, the first article of this series. I won’t write each day except the days when I feel it’s the time to write it and I have no particular order of events. This article is inspired by Didier Roche’s article series about Ubuntu Artful Day 1 until Day 8 from the days when Artful was still pre-release version.

What I remember to write now is:

7 December 2017: Ruben Rodriguez is back at Trisquel Forum with the plan to release Trisquel 8 and plan to plan Trisquel 9. This is a long awaited thing for the forum members. Ruben is the leader of Trisquel Project.

Startup Items: I placed redshift command at startup so now it runs every time Trisquel boots. Redshift is my real treatment for sleeplessness (hard to sleep disorder), a disorder caused by blue light. I say thank you for Redshift developer!

apt-daily.service: apparently, I still need to disable permanently anything related to packagekitd, unattended-upgrade, and apt-daily-blablabla because I found 2 days ago it eaten up (again!) my bandwidth as 100+ MB without my concern.

Desktop Icons: yes, desktop icons (like on Windows) feature is really helpful. Trisquel supports this by default so Windows users can adapt themselves into Trisquel faster. Personally I dislike GNOME 3’s approach (or any other desktop) that doesn’t permit the user to easily put icons on desktop area. However, actually my most used icon there is only IceCat Web Browser.

I follow Trisquel forum via email not via web.

This article is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Do You Know Uruk GNU/Linux?


It’s a new GNU/Linux distro that follows FSF’s FSDG. The most interesting things (after Uruk’s strong commitment) are it’s desktop oriented, it’s Trisquel derivative, and it has a new package manager which can mimic another package manager commands. I know Uruk from Trisquel Forum and currently I’m downloading the 2.0 Beta 1. Visit the Uruk Project Website at

This article is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Yakkety Repo Archive is Still Alive!


Today is Saturday 30 September 2017. Ubuntu 16.10 “Yakkety Yak” was already End-Of-Life at Thursday 20 July 2017. It’s already more than 2 months so far. So, as end-user, I supposed today I must find my Yakkety repo is also ended and moved to old-releases repo. But no, I don’t find that today, because I still can download packages from Yakkety repo located at This is amazing. Thanks to all Ubuntu Developers.

The result of apt-get update

The installation process of ‘geany’ package

This article is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

KDE neon Repo, Sources.list, and plasmashell 5.10.95


I am using KDE neon currently. To be specific, it’s neon dev-unstable (instead of neon dev stable), OS version 5.10.5. As a not technologist, I simply want to try Plasma 5.11 beta that’s just released 14 September ago. So I downloaded the 17 or 18 September (sorry, I forgot the date) built image. I assumed that all dev versions of neon must have 5.11 already at 17 September, so I tried it and … no. I didn’t found the plasmashell binary at 5.10.95. Instead, it’s still 5.10.90. Hey, so, where is the 5.10.95? This is written because I find problems while writing Plasma 5.11 article at UbuntuBuzz.
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Warning, packagekitd and snapd Eat Bandwidth!


Now I know for sure why each distro I ran eats my bandwidth extremely a lot without my permission, that’s because of PackageKit’s packagekitd daemon doing automatic updates in stealth. Not only that, but also Snappy’s snapd daemon eats my bandwidth without my permission too. Those two packagekitd and snapd are serious problems for limitedly-bandwidth users! These happened on neon, my favorite KDE distro, and also Ubuntu, Kubuntu, even openSUSE, and even Fedora. Tonight I do some searching and I finally understand packagekitd action is a part of GNOME Software or KDE Discover automatic update. Continue reading